Tag Archives: racism

Local (Twin Cities) event: “Holy America, Amanda!”: How the 19th-century holiness movement addressed racism and other social sins in middle-class America


This local event (yes, I know I shamelessly stole the title from one of my own recent blog posts) is the November meeting of the Twin Cities Emergent Cohort, 12:00 to 1:30 p.m. on Thursday, Nov 12th at Solomon’s Porch, Minneapolis (corner of 46th and Blaisdell).

Through the life of Amanda Berry Smith, an ex-slave, memoirist, and highly respected evangelist in the holiness movement of her day, we will look at several themes:

1. The holiness movement as an attempt to figure out how to live faithfully to Christ in the 19th-century urban Northeast’s consumerizing, modernizing culture (and what that may or may not tell us about how to do likewise in our own consumerist, modern/postmodern culture).

2. The courage needed to bring an unpopular message of sin (in this case racism) and the need for change to a middle-class Christian audience (Amanda had this in spades, but it didn’t come easily for her).

3. The relationship between social justice and the sanctification of individuals.

The Emergent Cohort is an opportunity for thinking and questioning people to join with others asking similar questions in an accepting, relaxed venue. The Twin Cities Emergent Cohort has been meeting in its current location for almost two years and involves participants sitting on couches, drinking coffee, and talking about a theological or social topic in a respectful and engaging way. The cohort meets the 2nd Tuesday of every month at noon at Solomon’s Porch in Minneapolis (again, corner of 46th and Blaisdell). The party breaks up about 1:30. Bring coffee or lunch and join us for theological conversation.