Tag Archives: stability

Christian stability in a frantically mobile world: A new book


In his co-written book Inhabiting the Church, New Monastic pioneer Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove began to reflect on what Benedictine monasticism can teach us today. Now he has dedicated an entire book to the Benedictine virtue of stability. Pennsylvania bookstore Hearts & Minds has posted an intriguing review of the book. A brief excerpt follows (click the link above for the whole review):

Lauren Winner writes on the back cover “Stability may be the virtue of the 21-st century Christians most ignore—and the virtue we are most called to embrace.  This fine book will inspire you to look at your own life, asking ‘Where am I restless? Where might God be calling me to be rooted, to stay put?'”

Indeed, most of us have failed in this virtue; we have not cared for our neighbors (or our own neighborhoods) as we ought.  We have not been rooted in place, or really engaged with the people and plot of creation in which we are placed.  We have been too busy to participate in the simpler rhythms of life.

Summary of chapter 6: The mission of the monks


The contemplative life in some way resembles the life of quasi-monastic scholarship lived by the dons of Oxford University. Lewis, Tolkien, and Williams taught there, and Sayers attended there and returned there repeatedly in her imagination. There is a culture there of, if not strict asceticism, then at least a communal life focused on the contemplation of the Good, the True, and the Beautiful, through the study of texts and the mutual admonition and edification of minds and spirits brought together in a sort of quasi-Benedictine life of stability. Continue reading